Exxon on target: Liza Destiny arrives 2019

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ExxonMobil says preparation for first oil in Guyana is on schedule and preliminary work being undertaken by key contractors is progressing well.

Liza Destiny – the Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel being designed by SBM Offshore to produce petroleum for the Liza Phase 1 development project, will arrive in Guyana by late 2019.

SBM has been contracted by ExxonMobil to install, lease and operate the Liza Destiny. The company commenced the front-end engineering and design and early engineering, procurement and construction work scope for the vessel at the end of 2016. An existing tanker, which will arrive in Singapore later this year, will be converted to the Liza Destiny. The vessel is being designed to produce up to 120,000 barrels of oil per day.

“That’s all progressing absolutely perfectly, on schedule…,” ExxonMobil Country Manager, Rod Henson, told OilNOW on Tuesday, adding, “In late 2019 that ship will then sail here to Guyana waters to the well site.”

Other key contractors include TechnipFMC and Saipem. Both companies are working to ensure all equipment and facilities are ready for first oil.

TechnipFMC is tasked with the engineering, manufacture and delivery of the subsea equipment while Saipem will perform engineering, procurement, construction, and installation of the risers, flow lines, and associated structures and jumpers.

“It is good news overall. The bottom line is; we are on schedule to meet our commitment to have first oil in 2020 and that is critical to us – meeting our commitments,” Henson pointed out.

The Liza field is approximately 190 kilometers offshore in water depths of 1,500 to 1,900 meters. Four drill centers are envisioned with a total of 17 wells, including eight production wells, six water injection wells and three gas injection wells. The Liza field is part of the Stabroek Block, which measures 6.6 million acres, or 26,800 square kilometers.

ExxonMobil affiliate Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited is operator and holds a 45 percent interest in the block while Hess Guyana Exploration Ltd. holds a 30 percent interest and CNOOC Nexen Petroleum Guyana Limited holds 25 percent.

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