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Thursday, January 21, 2021

PCJ looks to next phase of oil exploration as first 3D seismic survey is completed in Jamaica

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(The Gleaner) The Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ) is hoping that the post survey data analysis of the first 3D seismic survey of Jamaica’s offshore in the exploration for oil and gas will be encouraging enough to move the search to the next phase.

In a release issued Sunday, the PCJ said the first 3D seismic survey of Jamaica’s offshore was completed on May 8.

“Tullow’s decision to do the 3D Seismic Survey shows that the data indicators are pointing in the right direction and we hope that the results of the post survey data analysis will prompt them to move forward to the next phase,” said Winston Watson, group general manager of the PCJ.

Analysis of the data gathered from the six-week survey could take between a year and 18 months. The findings will determine if Tullow will elect to drill an exploratory well in Jamaica’s offshore.

The survey, which was undertaken by the United Kingdom-based Tullow Oil as part of a Production Sharing Agreement (PSA) with the PCJ, covered 2,250 square kilometres of the Walton Morant block.

The survey took approximately 45 days and was completed within the projected timeframe, the PCJ said.

The work was done by marine geophysical company, Polarcus whose principal seacraft, the Adira was supported by three vessels, one of which was Jamaican-owned, throughout the operation.

Observers from several local organisations including the PCJ, the National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA), Fisheries Division and the Caribbean Maritime University, were deployed on the Adira and her support vessels for the duration of the survey.

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